Job Opportunities

available opportunities to join the FOGGIE team

gas density projection

A list of open positions within the FOGGIE collaboration can be found below. The FOGGIE team especially welcomes applications from women, minorities, veterans, LGBTQ+ people, and members of other underrepresented groups. If you will be on the job market soon and there are no positions listed that start on an appropriate timescale, please contact Dr. Molly Peeples at molly@stsci.edu to be notified about openings as they come about.

We are also welcome collaborations in a wide range of observational and theoretical areas; please reach out if you are interested in collaborating.



postdoc position at Johns Hopkins University

Application review starts December 6, 2019; start date Fall 2020.

This postdoctoral research position at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD is aimed at using the FOGGIE simulations for galactic stellar halo modeling in the context of NASA’s forthcoming WFIRST mission. The successful applicant will work with Drs. Jason Tumlinson and Molly Peeples at Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and with the greater FOGGIE team. The full ad is available here.



postdoc position at Johns Hopkins University

Application review starts December 6, 2019; start date Fall 2020.

This postdoctoral research position at the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, MD is aimed at using the FOGGIE simulations for tracing high-redshift galaxy evolution with an eye towards JWST predictions. The successful applicant will work with Drs. Jason Tumlinson and Molly Peeples at Johns Hopkins University and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and with the greater FOGGIE team. The full ad is available here.



postdoc position at Michigan State University

Application review starts December 16, 2019; start date preferably early 2020.

Applications are invited for a postdoctoral research position in computational structure formation at Michigan State University. The successful candidate will work in conjunction with Professor Brian O’Shea to study galaxy formation using the Enzo-E code, which is a complete rewrite of the Enzo AMR code that uses the Charm++ parallel programming system to take advantage of the design of exascale-class supercomputers.

The responsibilities of this position include performing research in theoretical galaxy formation and participating in Enzo-E code development within the Enzo-E collaboration in support of this research. In addition to working with researchers in MSU’s Department of Computational Mathematics, Science, and Engineering and Department of Physics and Astronomy, the successful applicant will have the opportunity to lead projects or collaborate with other members of the Enzo-E code development team and users of the Enzo-E code on projects of mutual interest pertaining to galaxy formation, with the precise subject area depending on the candidate’s interests (e.g., high redshift galaxy formation, the circumgalactic medium, quenching, dwarf galaxy evolution, etc.). There will also be opportunities to mentor undergraduate students in projects related to this work and to participate in other professional development activities such as teaching, grant-writing, and public outreach. Travel and research funds will be available, as will computing time on MSU’s High Performance Computing Center, NSF XSEDE resources, and the new Frontera supercomputer at TACC.

Review of applications will begin on December 16, 2019, and will continue until the position has been filled. The starting date is negotiable with a preference toward candidates that are available in early 2020.

The full ad will be posted here once available.